Posted on Leave a comment

Balanced Health Immune Boost

Balanced Health Immune Boost with Vitamin C, Zinc

Balanced Health Immune Boost with Vitamin C, Zinc

A strong and balanced immune system is necessary to fight pathogens like bacteria and virus. But the immune system is an extensive network of cells, vessels and organs that have other jobs too, like defending your body against environmental pollutants. Luckily, research shows that it is possible to support the immune system through nutrition.

Following a wholesome and balanced diet are at the core of good health, but sometimes it’s not easy to get all the nutrition we need. This is why many health-conscious people use dietary supplements to fill the gap. Nutritional supplements that include a wide range of nutrients from plants and other natural sources can provide the extra boost we need to stay well, much like the following ingredients that are found in Balanced Immune Boost.

Vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin and antioxidant that benefits the immune system. It is considered an essential vitamin because it is not manufactured in the body, so must be consumed through diet. And even this can be tricky, as it is susceptible to break down during cooking or processing. If you are not consuming enough fresh fruits and vegetables that contain Vitamin C, you are missing out on the benefits it has to offer, such as immune support, healthy skin and iron absorption.

Zinc is a mineral found in all of our cells, yet is another nutrient that is not manufactured within the body. Our bodies use zinc to manufacture proteins and support metabolism, as well as a healthy immune system. In fact, studies show that too little zinc had an effect on certain enzymes that aid in reducing internal inflammation. The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for zinc is 8 mg for women and 11 mg for men, and since the body has no way to store zinc, we have to consume it every day. We can get this nutrient through food sources like oysters, beans, nuts and red meat, however those with digestive issues along with vegans and vegetarians are at a higher risk for deficiencies.

Magnesium is another important micronutrient that is linked to numerous functions from regulating blood pressure to immune support. It also supports healthy brain and cardiac function and is often used to relieve constipation. Sources of magnesium include whole grains, legumes, nuts and leafy green vegetables, and getting enough is important as it has a strong relationship with both innate and adaptive immunity. (1)

Elderberry extract is a concentrated liquid extracted from the elderberry plant. It just so happens this plant is packed with vitamins along with numerous other bioflavonoids that have a positive impact on our health. It is often used in over the counter, natural remedies for cold and flu because it is believed to support the immune system. In traditional and folk medicine, elderberry was considered one of the most healing plants available.

Echinacea Purpurea is another plant traditionally used as a medicinal herb. These flowering plants are also known as coneflowers and used in herbal remedies around the world to support health. Advocates of holistic health tout this herb today as a way to support the immune system, and believe it contains compounds believed to support a healthy immune response. While most evidence seems to be anecdotal, its popularity keeps it relevant, as it seems to work well when the body has been overtaxed and needs extra support.

Citrus Bioflavonoids / Hesperidin – Hesperidin is a plant chemical that is classified as a bioflavonoid from citrus fruit. Flavonoids have long been known to have antioxidant properties, making them important protectors of the body against certain health issues. At least one study shows it has a positive impact on health with immune support. While citrus bioflavonoids are used frequently in natural remedies to enhance the action of vitamin C, it is also believed to support wound healing, UV protection and skin health.

Olive leaf extract is the concentrated liquid derived from the leaves of olive trees. And while we always knew that olive oil it good for you, it turns out the leaves are also beneficial. They are rich in polyphenols; plant compounds that provide health benefits ranging from helping digestion to protecting the heart. Olive leaf extract show promise with a few potential health benefits, with some laboratory results showing it may protect from certain harmful microorganisms. (2)

Ginger Root Extract is a liquid extract of the rhizome of the Zingiber officinale, commonly known as ginger. Ginger is mainly used as a home remedy for nausea and other digestive ailments, and can be consumed as a spice, tea or nutritional supplement. When it comes to immune support, ginger has promise as it has displayed antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, along with other benefits. Ginger has been used for thousands of years as a natural remedy.

Thyme is a long-standing culinary staple that has pleased the palettes of chefs around the world for centuries. And it turns out this herb has more going for it than taste, as it is packed with vitamins C and A as well as copper, iron, and manganese. It has long been used as a natural remedy.

Purified Silver has been used throughout history to ward off infection and support health. Today, many holistic health remedies include purified silver which is believed to have powerful immune health effect. What advocates like most about this mineral is its ability to spare beneficial flora, making it a strong ally for immune support.

This Fix is in the Mix

Using one herb, mineral or vitamin rarely seems to have well-rounded effect on immunity and health. But just as a whole food provides benefits thanks to the combined nutrients, products with combined compounds for immune support can offer a wide range of protection. And when used with a healthy diet, ingredients like these can help anyone navigate the health challenges that today’s busy life seems to bring.

References:

1 Tam M, Gómez S, González-Gross M, Marcos A. Possible roles of magnesium on the immune system. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Oct;57(10):1193-7. doi: 10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601689. PMID: 14506478.

2 “Olive Leaf.” Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 25 Feb. 2020, www.mskcc.org/cancer-care/integrative-medicine/herbs/olive-leaf.

Balanced Immune Boost with Vitamin C Zinc Elderberry

Balanced Health Balanced Immune Boost with Vitamin C, Zinc, Elderberry to Naturally Support the Body’s Natural Defense 6 – 2 oz Bottles

  • Naturally supports your natural defense system.
  • Vitamins, minerals, herbal blend all plant sourced non-gmo ingredients.
  • All-natural comprehensive immune support. Formulated to be taken daily.
  • Vitamin C, Elderberry, Echinacea, Zinc plus Citrus Bioflavonoids, Silver and More

See More

 

$23.49 $19.74

42 in stock

Balanced Health Immune Boost Vitamin C Elderberry Zinc
Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

Benefits of a Healthy Diet and Exercise on the Immune System

Benefits of a Healthy Diet and Exercise on the Immune System

When it comes to staying healthy, your immune system is your body’s powerhouse. Keeping it strong and healthy through diet and exercise can help you avoid getting sick and feeling tired and rundown all the time. It can even help you prevent getting sick in the first place.

How Your Immune System Works

Your immune system operates as a network and runs throughout your body. It works hard at all times to identify and fight foreign invaders, known as pathogens. When it spots a pathogen, it triggers a response that boosts the number of white blood cells in your body. These are the cells that fight off invaders and keep us healthy.

There are two primary types of immune responses: Innate and adaptive. We’re born with innate immunity. The innate immune system recognizes foreign pathogens and tries to fight them using a generic response and includes our skin, hair, tears, sweat, and other physical barriers. (1)

Your adaptive immune system evolves as you age. It is made up of cellular and chemical responses that recognize familiar pathogens that you have been exposed to either through having an illness or having a vaccine.

How Your Diet Impacts Your Immune System

When your body is sick, it needs energy to fight off infections. Proper nutrition for the immune system includes eating foods that will provide the energy that the immune system needs to fight pathogens and prevent chronic inflammation, which can trigger immune responses. (2)

Here are a few specific things you can do to improve your diet and boost your immune system.

  1. Cut down on sugar

Sugar can do a lot of harm to our bodies, including causing us to become overweight. Additionally, sugar can prevent immune cells from attacking bacteria as they should. (3) When you have too much sugar, your immune system starts to effectively shut down, which can make you more susceptible to illnesses and less capable of fighting pathogens.

  1. Eat garlic

People have been eating garlic for medicinal purposes for centuries. It turns out, garlic can improve your immune function and is particularly useful in fighting the common cold or flu. (4) You can add garlic to your meals or take a garlic supplement when you start feeling a cold coming on.

  1. Add more fruits and vegetables to your diet

The majority of the nutrients our bodies need can be found in fruits and vegetables. Eating a lot of just one type of food won’t be as beneficial as getting multiple vitamins from a variety of sources.

Some specific vitamins and minerals that you should add to your diet to get a boost of for your immune system include the following:

  • Zinc: Boosts white blood cell count. Sources include lentils, beans, sesame seeds, and pumpkin seeds.
  • Vitamin C: Antioxidant that destroys free radicals. Sources include citrus fruits, red peppers, and broccoli.
  • Vitamin D: Can reduce your risk of contracting viral infections. Sources include sunlight and fortified foods.
  • Vitamin E: Antioxidant that destroys free radicals and improves immune function. Sources include spinach, broccoli, seeds, and nuts.
  • Beta-carotene: Antioxidant that reduces inflammation and increases the number of your body’s disease-fighting cells. Sources include sweet potatoes, green leafy vegetables, and carrots.

How Exercise Benefits Your Immune System

In addition to eating well and getting a variety of nutrients into your diet, you should be regularly exercising to keep your immune system strong. Research has shown that inactivity, aging, and obesity can all be detrimental to your immune system. (5)

A simple solution is to add more activity to your lifestyle. You don’t need to worry about intensity, especially if you are new to working out. Starting small with light exercises can be enough to make a difference and help you stay healthy.

When to Exercise

Regular exercise can prevent illness, but sometimes you still get sick. If you have a mild illness, you might be able to exercise through it and feel better. Exercising is thought to be able to flush fluids from your lungs and help you feel better if you have a minor cold. (6) It may also raise your body temperature enough to more effectively fight off infections (similar to what happens when you get a fever). (6)

Don’t Overdo It

There is such a thing as getting too much exercise. In order to improve your immune system, you want to make sure you don’t cross the line of overdoing it. Overtraining has been shown to lead to fatigue and worsened performance, which can negatively impact your immune function. (7)

Similarly, don’t try to exercise if you are feeling extremely ill. If you have anything more severe than a minor cold, you’re probably better off resting than you would be trying to get through a light workout.

How Much to Exercise to Get the Benefits

A good rule of thumb is to get 150 minutes of moderate activity every week. This can include running, walking, swimming, or cycling for 30 minutes a day, five days a week. This amount of exercise has been shown to improve immune function without putting too much strain on your body. (8) Find ways to add more steps to your day by parking further away, taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or adding an after-dinner walk to your evening routine.

 

Conclusion

Taking care of your body through proper nutrition and regular exercise can help you boost your immune system to prevent illnesses and give your body the tools it needs to fight them off faster.

If you are struggling to get all your nutrients through food, you aren’t alone. Most adults don’t get all the nutrients they need through diet alone.

Fortunately, supplements can help fill the gaps and ensure that you get the right balance of nutrients into your body every day. Taking a supplement like Balanced ECZ Immune Support is an easy way to make sure you are getting enough nutrients to have a healthy immune system, no matter what life throws your way.

 

References:

  1. The innate and adaptive immune systems. (2020, July 30). Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK279396/
  2. Childs, C. E., Calder, P. C., & Miles, E. A. (2019, August 16). Diet and Immune Function. Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6723551/
  3. Sanchez, A., Reeser, J., Lau, H., Yahiku, P., Willard, R., McMillan, P., . . . Magie, A. (1973, November 01). Role of sugars in human neutrophilic phagocytosis. Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-abstract/26/11/1180/4732762
  4. Nantz, M. P., Rowe, C. A., Miller, C. E., Creasy, R. A., Stanilka, J. M., & Percival, S. S. (2012, January 24). Supplementation with aged garlic extract improves both NK and γδ-T cell function and reduces the severity of cold and flu symptoms: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled nutrition intervention. Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22280901/
  5. Nieman, D. (2020, May 8). Coronavirus disease-2019: A tocsin to our aging, unfit, corpulent, and immunodeficient society. Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7205734/
  6. Exercise and immunity: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007165.htm
  7. Hackney, A. C., & Koltun, K. J. (2012, December). The immune system and overtraining in athletes: Clinical implications. Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23540172/
  8. Regular exercise benefits immunity — even in isolation. (2020, March 31). Retrieved September 05, 2020, from https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/03/200331162314.htm
Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

Vitamin Deficiency in America Today

Balanced Health vitamin deficiency featured blog post

Vitamin Deficiency in America Today

When we think of nutritional deficiencies, third world countries are often the first thing that comes to mind. Unfortunately, vitamin deficiencies are extensive in the United States and affect Americans from all walks of life.  So, how did we get here?

Our Food Supply

Even though most of us have access to as much food as we want, it is not always healthy food. Busy lifestyles have forced many people to eat meals of highly processed and fast foods that are replete with added sodium and sugar. Factory farming processes have rendered the earth’s soil deficient in nutrients, which means less nutrients in the food supply.

Food processing and manufacturing practices further deplete nutrients that human bodies rely on for good health. And when added to the fact that most Americans do not follow the healthy eating guidelines, it’s no wonder that about half of Americans suffer from at least one, preventable chronic disease. (1)

Most Common Vitamin Deficiencies

While vitamin deficiencies are widespread, they vary from person to person. This is due to changes in diet, food sources and lifestyle factors like exercise or smoking as both create a need for extra nutritional support. At the same time, digestive problems can lead to absorption problems, so even if one is eating a healthy diet, they may not be able to absorb the vitamins that the food has to offer. Some common nutritional deficiencies include the following:

  • Vitamin B6, which is important for immune support. A deficiency can lead to rashes, dry skin, and anemia, and deficiency is usually due to digestive issues. People with an overall vitamin B deficiency will usually have lack of B6, and deficiencies are more common in those who smoke, drink too much alcohol or have an autoimmune disease. Since B6 is important for immune support, getting enough is important for overall health. Some foods that include B6 are fish, poultry, spinach, bananas and nuts.
  • Vitamin B12 aids in red blood cell production as well as support for the nervous system. Deficiencies are common in America and affects elderly people, vegetarians and those with digestive or absorption issues. Foods that supply B12 include shellfish, salmon and sardines. Beef, liver, eggs and cheese also provide B12, but in lesser amounts. For those who cannot get enough through diet, supplementation may help fill in the nutritional gap.
  • Vitamin C is necessary to support immune function, as well as for healthy skin and hair. Deficiencies can lead to rough, bumpy skin, dry hair, premature wrinkles and susceptibility to cold and flu. Foods that are high in vitamin C include citrus fruits, cherries, and bell peppers.
  • Vitamin D is also called the sunshine vitamin because our bodies manufacture it when we get adequate sun exposure. It is mainly deficient in people who don’t get enough sunshine or those who wear too much sunscreen while in the sun. Nutritionally, vegans, vegetarians and those with milk allergies are at risk for D deficiencies, since the best sources are fish, fish liver oils and egg yolks. Other food sources include fortified dairy and grain products, but some question if that type of vitamin D is absorbable for most people. This vitamin is important for bones, and not having enough in the body can lead to issues like soft bones, as well as lowered immunity.
  • Vitamin K is actually two nutrients, vitamins K1 and K2, which are necessary to prevent blood-vessel calcification, especially if too much calcium is taken. (2) Sadly, the Western diet seriously lacks vitamin K, especially vitamin K2, leaving Americans prone to deficiencies. This nutrient is found mainly in leafy green vegetables and other green veggies like cabbage, brussels sprouts, broccoli and green beans.
  • Iodine is not a vitamin but rather a trace element, and is worth mentioning due to its importance. It is imperative for thyroid health aids in the manufacturing of certain thyroid hormones. Deficiencies may be due to medications, pregnancy, lack of dietary iodine, and selenium deficiency.
  • Iron is also not a vitamin but mineral that is necessary for healthy blood and energy. Deficiencies are common in America and may be due to vegetarianism, medications and overall poor diet. Anemia is the result of low blood iron and can result in fatigue, shortness of breath, pale skin and cold hands and feet. Animal proteins are the main source of this nutrient.

The Solution for Vitamin Deficiency

Chronic disease and obesity are directly related to lifestyle and that includes diet. But other problems arise from vitamin deficiencies like fatigue, foggy head, poor skin quality, poor sleep, hormonal imbalances, weight gain, hair loss and more.

We know we should eat right, and not eating right can lead to serious health issues, including physical and mental health, but with today’s busy lifestyle that can be difficult. Resolve today to fill in the gap with strategies like these:

  • Eat two servings of fruit every morning as a breakfast or snack for a fresh start to your day
  • Make a breakfast smoothie easy with frozen kale, strawberries and a banana for lasting energy and extra nutrition
  • Add a superfood powder to your smoothie or drink a superfood supplement in water or juice each day to power up
  • Resolve to eat at least one green salad every day, even if it’s a small one
  • Drink fresh-made vegetable juice if you simply cannot eat your veggies
  • Be sure to consume healthy protein sources every day, especially if you are an older American, vegan, vegetarian, or physically active.

Sometimes we have a difficult time eating the right foods in the amounts necessary to fulfill our nutritional needs. When this happens, food supplements can help round out gaps in our dietary vitamin profile. If you use supplements, look for those that are from food sources and keep in mind that liquid vitamins are more easily absorbed than other types.

Conclusion

Studies show that at least 1/3 of Americans are deficient in at least one vitamin (3), in spite of being well fed. This is due to a variety of reasons including poor soil, processed foods, junk food, and the overall Western diet so inherent in the culture. Some experts also believe that the average adult may require more nutrients than what guidelines recommend, to help combat stress and illness.

Be proactive with diet and lifestyle so you don’t become part of the statistics. Use the above guidelines and strive to consume a healthy diet. And if healthy eating is a challenge for you, use a food based supplement to ensure you are getting all you need.

 

References:

  1.  US Department of Health and Human Services and US Department of Agriculture. 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans December 2015. Available at: https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/. Accessed 7/8/2020

2 Maresz K. Proper Calcium Use: Vitamin K2 as a Promoter of Bone and Cardiovascular Health. Integr Med (Encinitas). 2015;14(1):34-39.

3 Bird JK, Murphy RA, Ciappio ED, McBurney MI. Risk of Deficiency in Multiple Concurrent Micronutrients in Children and Adults in the United States. Nutrients. 2017;9(7):655. Published 2017 Jun 24. doi:10.3390/nu9070655

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

Super Foods for Super Nutrition

Balanced Health Super Foods blog post featured image
super foods macro greens with healthy benefits

Super Foods for Super Nutrition

Life Super Foods Micro Greens

In the world of nutrition, there are healthy foods and then there are super healthy foods. Called super foods for short, these include various vegetables, fruits and even grasses that pack a huge nutritional punch per serving. Consuming them on a regular basis is one of the best ways to fill in nutritional deficits that are common in our modern food supply.

Life Super Foods is a nutritional supplement that includes a variety of highly nutritious components like micro greens, potent antioxidants, immune boosting prebiotics and proteins. A dash of harmonizing foods like maca, squash, and holy basil round out the nutritional profile to make a supplement that adds a positive boost to any diet.

Micro Greens

Micro greens are the classification of plant foods that are older than sprouts, yet harvested before maturation. They consist of mainly common vegetables and herbs that are still small and green as the vegetable is not fully developed when picked, hence the name “micro greens.” The early harvesting creates a supplement that packs all the nutrition of the large plant and more, so less is required to get the same nutritional benefit.

While micro greens might include some common plants like arugula, chives, cilantro and beets, some lesser known greens include moringa, barley grass and blue green algae. These nutrient-dense super foods provide a wide variety of vitamins and minerals including vitamins A and K as well as manganese and folate. And the best part of these little nutritional powerhouses is that they contain up to 40 times more nutrients than their adult counterparts.

Super Powerful Vegetables

It is widely known that vegetables are an important part of a healthy lifestyle diet. Due to increased awareness about diet and health, we also know that some foods are associated with lowering the risk of chronic disease while providing numerous important nutrients like potassium, fiber and folate. Some of the vegetables found in Life Super Foods are widely known for their superior health benefits.

  • Spinach is packed with antioxidants, which can help ward of aging and disease. It contains important compounds like quercetin, lutein and natural nitrates and can support eye health and blood pressure. Antioxidants help improve oxidative stress balance in the body, making spinach a supreme leafy green.
  • Peas were once thought of as merely an inexpensive pantry item to keep on hand, but research has shown they are powerful vegetables worth mentioning. They are packed with nutrients that have anti-inflammatory effects and when used as a protein powder can aid digestion, help you feel fuller for longer and have a positive impact on muscle strength and size. (1)
  • Beets have quickly become a super food supplement in their own right. This is because they contain nitric oxide, which helps transport oxygen throughout the body. Many athletes use this supplement for increased energy and quicker recovery from workouts, along with the added benefits of blood pressure support and heart health.

Super Antioxidant Fruits

While vegetables are the focus of many healthy diet plans, fruits also boast nutritional properties that you don’t want to miss. They are high in phytonutrients that help support and nourish all functions of the body and contain high amounts of antioxidants that help fight free radicals. It happens that the fruits found in Life Super Foods are some of the most nutrient dense foods available.

  • Cranberries are low in sugar but higher in antioxidants than most other fruits. In fact, one powerful antioxidant called proanthocyanidins, or PACs for short, are anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory, which may be why they are known to support the immune system.
  • Blueberries contain strong phytonutrients and antioxidants that support cardiovascular health. They are also packed with vitamins C and B6 along with folate, potassium and fiber. And in one report from 2018 published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, researchers found that blueberry powder supplementation had a positive effect on blood glucose. (2)
  • Lemons are high in antioxidants like vitamin C and flavonoids, which help fight free radicals. Free radicals are linked to premature aging, among other things, as they damage cells and wreak havoc within the body. Vitamin C also aids in the formation of collagen, which supports healthy skin and a healthy circulatory system.

Healthy Harmonizing Foods

Harmonizing foods are those that have been traditionally used to help balance and calm all systems of the body. Herbs like maca have traditionally been used to balance women’s hormonal health, holy basil is a traditional remedy for stress and anxiety along with numerous other health benefits, and annatto promotes healthy digestion.

While one serving of Life Super Foods is merely 2 small scoops, it packs a significant dose of nutrients, like:

  • Vitamin C – The organic food blend provides 40 mg of this antioxidant, which not only supports the immune system, but also supports the health of connective tissue and bones.
  • Vitamin E – One serving provides over 44 mg of this immune boosting nutrient.
  • Folic Acid – Folic acid is a B-complex vitamin that helps maintain immunity, while aiding in digestive health. Luckily, one serving of Life Super Foods provides 133.3 mcg of folic acid, making it easy to fit it into any diet.

Life Super Foods includes foods and herbs that have been used as health aids for centuries. Supplements that include micro greens, fruits, vegetables and herbs can support any diet, especially those that fall short on nutrition or for people who are extremely active and require that extra boost. With today’s collective knowledge of various foods and their benefits, we can all take advantage to get that extra nutritional edge for energy, health and balance in all areas of our lives.

References:

1 Babault N, Païzis C, Deley G, et al. Pea proteins oral supplementation promotes muscle thickness gains during resistance training: a double-blind, randomized, Placebo-controlled clinical trial vs. Whey protein. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2015;12(1):3. Published 2015 Jan 21. doi:10.1186/s12970-014-0064-5

2 Rocha DMUP, Caldas APS, da Silva BP, Hermsdorff HHM, Alfenas RCG. Effects of blueberry and cranberry consumption on type 2 diabetes glycemic control: a systematic review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2018;59(11):1816-1828. doi:10.1080/10408398.2018.1430019

Life Super Foods Greens and Super Fruit Blend

Life Super Foods Macro Greens Blends Super Greens for Energy and Protein Super Fruits for Antioxidants and Vitality Plus Pre Biotics for Cleanse and Detox 22 servings.   Life Super Foods is the most complete Nutritious Micro Greens, Super Foods and Super Fruits supplement.  

  • Super Food Blends
  • Antioxidant Blend
  • Immune Boosting Blend
  • Pea Protein
  • Harmonizing Foods Blend

$31.47 $28.47

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

Digestive Health is the Core of Wellness

Digestive Health is the Core of Wellness
Digestive Health is the Core of Wellness

Digestive Health is the Core of Wellness

 

When your digestion is out of whack, your whole body can suffer. This is because digestion is linked to the immune system, mental wellbeing and even heart health. But can we control the health of our digestive system?

The old saying that you are what you eat still holds true today. Our bodies use the vitamins, minerals and other nutrients to build new cells for muscle tissue, heart tissue and skin. Nutrients are the building blocks used by every part of your body to replace damaged or worn out cells. This is called cell turnover and takes place everywhere including your organs and the lining of your digestive tract. If your diet is subpar, so too are the building blocks that are used in cell turnover.

Your Gut Microbiome

The gut is another term for the digestive system and includes the microbiome. The microbiome is the environment that hosts a wide array of bacteria, fungi and other microbes that exist mainly in the intestinal tract. Sometimes referred to by scientists as another organ, the gut microbiome is part of the gut-brain axis and must remain balanced to work properly.

The gut-brain axis is a new area of interest for scientists and doctors alike because it shows how intricately connected our digestive health is with our physical and mental health. The key to health is that good or healthy microbes keep the harmful ones in check. And while research is ongoing, one thing for sure is that to keep this area healthy, diet, probiotics and prebiotics are at the core of digestive health.

How to Improve Digestive Health

Many factors affect digestion including diet, exercise, medications and even our mental state. Overall a healthy lifestyle improves digestive health and is well within our control. But sometimes it seems like the bad pathogens are winning in spite of our best efforts. The following are some tips that can help keep your digestive health intact.

Focus on Fiber

Fiber is a complex carbohydrate found mainly in fresh, whole fruits, vegetables and grains while some people get an added boost with a fiber supplement. There are different types of fiber that serve different purposes, and each is important for healthy digestion. 

Soluble fiber is found mainly in nuts, seeds, oats, lentils and some fruits and vegetables. It dissolves in the digestive tract and by doing so, help soften and remove waste. Insoluble fiber, on the other hand, does not dissolve and adds bulk to stool, allowing it to pass through the digestive tract more efficiently. Consuming a variety of these healthy foods ensures you get both types of fiber.

Pay Attention to Prebiotics and Probiotics

Prebiotics are special types of plant fibers that feed and stimulate growth of healthy organisms in the gut microbiome, while probiotics contain live organisms that contribute to the healthy microbe population. Prebiotic foods include most fruits and vegetables and probiotics are found in specific foods like yogurt as well as fermented foods like kimchi, kombucha and sauerkraut. Maintaining a consistent intake of both will contribute to and maintain a healthy balance of good bacteria while preventing an overgrowth harmful pathogens that disrupt health.

Avoid High Fat Diets

Diets that are high in unhealthy fats can contribute to not only poor digestion, but other health issues as well. Unhealthy fats are those found in most animal fats as well as most junk and highly processed foods. They are easy to identify, since they are found in foods that are commonly unhealthy like pizza, burgers and hot dogs.

Healthy fats like those found in salmon, avocados, nuts and seeds will contribute to health. They are known to support healthy skin, a well-functioning brain and weight control. But don’t overdo it on these either, because too much of any fat can slow or inhibit digestion.

Small and Frequent Meals

Smaller, frequent meals consisting of wholesome foods are easy on the digestion as they do not overtax the system. Researchers at Duke Health found that smaller meals are more optimal for digestion, as it allows better energy expenditure and blood sugar levels. (1) If your digestion needs help, try consuming six small meals a day, each with a protein or starch and vegetables. Eat fruit alone for quick digestion and assimilation. Many who follow this type of eating report surges in energy levels as well as better digestion and metabolism.

Supplemental Nutrition

If you are experiencing impaired digestion, it will be difficult for your body to digest and use the nutrients from your diet. If this is the case, liquid food supplements are easier for the body to assimilate, allowing you to take advantage of the full nutrient profile. For some people, increasing nutrients like vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients provide the building blocks for a stronger digestive system, which can lead to optimal health.

Move Your Body

Exercise increases blood flow, and helps your digestive system remain active. This is because when blood flow is stimulated, it includes the blood flow throughout the digestive tract. This means more digestive fluids and more movement without the sluggishness that a sedentary lifestyle can bring. And the best part is that research shows that exercise improves gastric emptying for those who suffer from nausea or bloating after eating. (2)

Stress Management

Stress creates physical reactions in the body that may interfere with digestion. For example, the stress reaction can cause a decrease of blood flow and oxygen to the stomach, which may create an imbalance in the gut microbiome. In addition, chronic stress promotes digestive problems and has similar effects of diets that are high in unhealthy fats. (3) Incorporating stress management practices into your daily routine such as meditation or journaling can go a long way in helping your body manage stress better.

Conclusion

Improve your body and mind with practices that support healthy digestion. Remember that health begins in the kitchen, and an overall healthy lifestyle is the best way to maintain good health, so you can enjoy life more fully.

References:

1 Sheena Faherty December 16, & Faherty, S. (2014, December 16). Small, Frequent Meals are Better for Your Metabolism. Retrieved July 01, 2020, from https://www.dukehealth.org/blog/small-frequent-meals-are-better-your-metabolism

2 Evans, G., Watson, P., Shirreffs, S., & Maughan, R. (2015). The Effect of Exercise Intensity on Subsequent Gastric Emptying Rate in Humans. IJSNEM International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism.

3 Foster JA, Rinaman L, Cryan JF. Stress & the gut-brain axis: Regulation by the microbiome. Neurobiol Stress. 2017;7:124-136. Published 2017 Mar 19. doi:10.1016/j.ynstr.2017.03.001

Life Super Foods Greens and Super Fruit Blend

Life Super Foods Macro Greens Blends Super Greens for Energy and Protein Super Fruits for Antioxidants and Vitality Plus Pre Biotics for Cleanse and Detox 22 servings.   Life Super Foods is the most complete Nutritious Micro Greens, Super Foods and Super Fruits supplement.  

  • Super Food Blends
  • Antioxidant Blend
  • Immune Boosting Blend
  • Pea Protein
  • Harmonizing Foods Blend

$31.47 $28.47

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

The Power of Antioxidants

The Power of Antioxidants blog featured image
The Power of Antioxidants

The Power of Antioxidants

 

Many of us are familiar with the term, antioxidants. They protect us from free radical damage and are found in many different fruits, vegetables and even certain types of tea. Through all the information, it might get lost that antioxidants are truly powerful substances that protect the body from cell damage. They are as common as that anti-aging nutrient Vitamin C and as unheard of as bilberry that can help one from night blindness, but are a necessary part of healthy nutrition.

What are Oxidants and Oxidative Stress?

Oxidants are shorthand for oxidizing agents or oxidizing materials. In general, they are substances that are short on electrons, so take them from other substances, namely our body’s molecules. This process may render them unstable, and when this take place on a regular basis, the process of oxidative stress begins. Free radicals are the most commonly known oxidizing agents and can be created from our internal metabolic processes or found in foods like processed meats and some unhealthy fats and oils.

The Problem with Oxidative Stress

While oxidation is a normal process that results in metabolic waste, oxidative stress is an unhealthy state where the body has an imbalance of free radicals and antioxidants. Oxidative stress can damage cells and is linked to a host of health issues such as:

  • Chronic internal inflammation
  • Premature aging
  • Heart disease
  • Atherosclerosis (hardening of blood vessels)
  • Diabetes
  • Neurodegenerative diseases (like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease)
  • Certain cancers

As we age, our bodies lose the ability to fight the effects of oxidative stress. At the same time, heavy exercise, pollution, smoking, medications and alcohol can all increase oxidative stress. But antioxidants and the foods they are found in can go a long way in neutralizing free radicals or preventing the damage they do to our cells.

The Power of Antioxidants

Our bodies rely on a healthy diet to help fight oxidizing agents and free radicals from the outside, and to maintain toxins from our internal processes, as well. Antioxidants help us in the fight against oxidative stress, and play a role in prevention of many health issues.

The term, “antioxidants,” is not truly a group of substances, but more a description of what some substances can do. While some are made internally, our best source of antioxidants is in the foods we eat. And while it is common knowledge that fruits and vegetables are a great source of powerful antioxidants, it might be surprising to learn that some common nutrients are also in this category. Some common antioxidants include:

  • Vitamin A, C and E
  • Beta-carotene
  • Lycopene
  • Lutein
  • Selenium
  • manganese
  • Flavonoids
  • Catechins
  • Polyphenols

This is only a partial list and each antioxidant has its own function, which is why nutritionists encourage people to eat a variety of healthy foods.

The Benefits of Antioxidants

Each antioxidant has a different function for various benefits, and we need a variety of them for good health. Some benefits of antioxidants include:

  • Protect Your DNA – Oxidative stress from free radical damages DNA, and as we age the ability to neutralize free radical damage lessens. This is why it becomes more important to consume foods and superfoods with antioxidants throughout adulthood.
  • Protect Brain Function – Free radical damage doesn’t stop at skin cells, they can harm or damage brain cells, too. But studies show that the antioxidants luteolin and flavonoid diosmin improve brain function while lowering oxidative stress. (1)
  • Better Eyesight – Some antioxidants protect eye health, which is important since cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affect millions of people every year. In fact, according to the American Optometric Association, AMD is a leading cause of blindness in mature adults, yet studies by the National Eye Institute have shown that antioxidants can delay or even prevent this debilitating health problem.
  • Diabetes – People with diabetes have increased free radical activity accompanied by decreased antioxidant protection, which leads to a higher rate of oxidative damage. And while studies find no evidence that synthetic (man-made imitation) antioxidants do not provide significant protection it is widely accepted that the antioxidants found is food sources are beneficial.
  • Anti-Aging – The free radical theory of aging simply states that we age prematurely when our cells are in a state of oxidative stress. Antioxidants can protect us from the effects of free radicals and can help repair the damage. And those who exercise, endure higher levels of stress, lack fresh fruits and vegetables in their diet or who live in higher pollution areas can all benefit from consumer higher amounts of antioxidants to combat the higher risk of oxidative stress from each of these risk factors.

Sources of Antioxidants

It is generally agreed by nutritional experts that food is the best source of antioxidants. As far as supplements, synthetic (or fake) antioxidant supplements should be used with caution while supplements that contain antioxidants from whole food sources can be beneficial.

Because different foods contain different nutrients and antioxidants, consuming a wide variety of healthy foods will help you get a variety of each. The following is a list of some important antioxidants and the foods that provide them:

  • Carotenoids are antioxidants that support eye health, immunity and reduce cancer risk. Some of these foods include carrots, spinach, kale, oranges, yams and tomatoes.
  • Flavonoids can reduce the risk of certain cancers, is anti-inflammatory and protect skin. They are found in apples, grapefruits, onions, ginger, coffee and green tea.
  • Ellagic acid also reduces cancer risk as well as internal inflammation. Foods that are rich in ellagic acid include blueberries, strawberries, grapes, pomegranates, pecans and walnuts.
  • Resveratrol is mainly found in grape skins, making red wine a fun and popular antioxidant beverage for some. This antioxidant supports brain and heart health and can be found in blueberries, strawberries, pistachios and dark chocolate.
  • Glucosinolates are antioxidants found mostly in cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, brussel sprouts and bok choy. They are known to support metabolic function, help with internal inflammation and even protect from cancer.

Conclusion

Making healthy and wholesome foods choice like fruits, vegetables, whole grains and legumes a focus of your meal plan can improve your health by boosting antioxidant levels. And a healthy diet provides more energy and immune support so you can enjoy life without health issues. When you cannot get enough antioxidants in your diet, consider supplementing with whole food sources to maintain balance in your diet and health.

 

References:

1 Yoo DY, Choi JH, Kim W, et al. Effects of luteolin on spatial memory, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a scopolamine-induced amnesia model. Neurol Res. 2013;35(8):813-820. doi:10.1179/1743132813Y.0000000217

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

America’s Vitamin D Deficiency

America’s Vitamin D Deficiency
America’s Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D is a unique nutrient that our bodies are capable of manufacturing from sunshine. And while this sounds like an easy way to get our share of this important vitamin, it turns nearly 50% of Americans are deficient in it. To make things worse, many people are currently staying indoors more, so the true numbers may be higher.

What is Vitamin D

Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin that our bodies manufacture but is also found in some animal products and plant foods. It is essential because it helps the body absorb vitamin C, supports the skeletal system and supports immune health, among other things.

Vitamin D is not just one, but a family of compounds that are slightly different from each other. Vitamin D2 is found in plant-based food, while D3 is the type our bodies make and found in animal foods such as butter, beef liver and egg yolks, and lanolin. Vitamin D4 is less studied, but we do know that mushrooms are a good source for this.

Lack of vitamin D is linked to some health problems. Up until the 1940s, a skeletal disorder called rickets was devasting children in American. Rickets results in softening and weakening of the bones, and researchers eventually found that vitamin D deficiency was the cause. Surprisingly, some doctors today see the number of rickets cases growing, especially in industrialized countries. (1)

Who’s at Risk?

Just like any nutrient deficiency, some people are more at risk than others. Risk factors include:

  • Lack of sunshine
  • Using sunblock or sunscreen lotion
  • Dark skin
  • Vegan diets
  • Digestive problems or malabsorption
  • Obesity

Sunshine is necessary for the production of vitamin D, and doctors recommend spending at least 20 minutes in sunshine every day with more than 40% of the skin exposed. (2) About 50% to 90% of vitamin D is from sunlight and the rest comes from diet, but covering up while outside can stop the body from using sunshine, while cloudy days can also inhibit the sun necessary for vitamin D. Those with dark skin may need more time in the sun because darker pigmentation acts as a natural sunscreen.

Digestive problems can cause a vitamin D deficiency due to absorption problems. Celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease (IBS) are two of the digestive health issues that can lead to the inability to absorb certain nutrients. In addition, body fat can bind to vitamin D, making obesity a risk factor for deficiencies, as well.

Benefits of Vitamin D

Aside from rickets there are many reasons to ensure you get enough vitamin D. Here are just a few of the health benefits and the role that it plays in your body:

  • Maintains healthy levels of calcium and phosphorus
  • Maintains healthy bones and teeth
  • Supports the immune system
  • Supports lung and cardiovascular health
  • Supports the nervous system

Vitamin D can also support healthy pregnancies and nursing babies. It seems that having a sufficient amount of this nutrient provides many benefits in pregnant women. But low exposure to vitamin D in children seems to correlate with a greater risk of allergies. Maintaining healthy nutritional levels can certainly benefit both mother and child.

Sources of Vitamin D

As mentioned, sunshine is the best source, however, doctors note that even if you get adequate sunshine, your body can only make so much at once. Therefore, food sources of vitamin D are just as crucial, and may be more important when people are inside for longer periods than normal. Knowing which foods are the best sources of vitamin D can help you maintain healthy levels of it in your blood.

  • Fatty fish like salmon, sardines and tuna are excellent sources of vitamin D. These fish are also a great source of healthy Omega 3 fatty acids and protein, too.
  • Cod liver oil is taken by many for skin and digestive health as well as a source of vitamin D. In fact, just one dose can account for more than 200% of the recommended daily value
  • Mushrooms are a vegan favorite when it comes to nutritional superfoods, and mushrooms don’t disappoint. They are a great source of vitamin D as well as potassium and vitamin C.
  • Yogurt is a source of vitamin D, magnesium and potassium. Avoid the high-sugar yogurts and opt for plain. Adding your own toppings like fruit and honey can boost the nutrition count and allow you to control the amount of sugar you consume.
  • Eggs are a rich source of nutrients, but don’t throw out the yolks. Egg yolks contain vitamin D along with healthy amounts of iron and protein.
  • Ricotta cheese is considered a great source for D as well as protein. But go easy because it is also high in fat.

What About Supplements?

Even if you are an avid outdoor person or sun worshipper, sunny days are not guaranteed year-round. At the same time, it is not advisable to sit in the sun with 40% of your skin exposed if it is too cold outside. And even if sunshine exposure is adequate, vegans may have a more difficult time obtaining their vitamin D through food since sources are mainly from animal products.

Luckily, supplementing with vitamin D does have an impact when it comes from a natural source. And it makes getting your daily dose of this nutrient easy when you have to stay home, like during bad weather or for other reasons. Supplementation may also help vegans and pregnant women reap the benefits of adequate levels of vitamin D, like boosting energy and strong bones.

Keep your body strong with healthy nutrition and exercise. Focus on foods that contain vitamin D along with daily sunshine to help you maintain healthy levels of this all-important nutrient. And when life gets too busy, supplements can help fill in nutritional gaps, so you be sure that you are doing all you can to support your healthy body.

References:

1 Uday S, Högler W. Nutritional Rickets and Osteomalacia in the Twenty-first Century: Revised Concepts, Public Health, and Prevention Strategies [published correction appears in Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2017 Aug 14;:]. Curr Osteoporos Rep. 2017;15(4):293‐302. doi:10.1007/s11914-017-0383-y

2 Sizar O, Khare S, Goyal A, et al. Vitamin D Deficiency. [Updated 2020 Feb 26]. In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2020 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532266/

Balanced Health Vitamin D3 

  • D3 2,000 IU liquid for fast absorption and more bioavailable
  • With MCT Coconut Oil and light berry flavor
  • Non GMO, plant sourced ingredients
  • 2 oz 120 Servings

36 in stock

$18.99 $14.37

Buy 2 for FREE Shipping

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

The Benefits of Vitamin C

The Benefits of Vitamin C

 

Vitamin C, also called ascorbic acid, is an essential nutrient and antioxidant that is important for tissue repair and enzyme function. It is considered essential because our bodies don’t manufacture it, and it is water soluble, so you need to replenish this vitamin every day. The recommended daily amount of vitamin C for women is 75 mg and 90 mg for men, while some studies showed that more benefits are recognized at higher amounts.

Unfortunately, vitamin C can be destroyed by high temperatures and other forms of food processing. Boiling and steaming food can cause up to a 34% loss of C while pressure cooking creates a loss of around 10%. Fresh fruits and vegetables are the best way to take advantage of all nutrients including vitamin C, but if you aren’t able to keep up with the recommended 5 – 9 servings a day, supplementation might be an option.

The functions of vitamin C are extensive, making it a widely researched nutrient with more benefits still being discovered today. It turns out that patients with health issues often have low levels of this nutrient, while those with health concerns have an increased need for antioxidants like ascorbic acid.

Environmental and lifestyle factors like smoking, stress or high amounts of air pollution also increase the need for vitamin C. And because it is an essential nutrient that our bodies rely on, the benefits are numerous including immune support, brain health protection and wrinkle prevention.

Immune Support

Immune support is by far the most common reason why people supplement with vitamin C. That’s because this nutrient is associated with many areas of immunity, helps protect cells and may even shorten wound healing time.

As an antioxidant vitamin C becomes part of the skin’s defense system, which is our outer layer of protection and often our first line of defense. Antioxidants protect us from free radicals that are linked to a host of health issues, and it just so happens that vitamin C is a type of antioxidant called carotenoids. And because it protects the integrity of cells, it is the perfect nutrient to support immune health.

Brain Health

It turns out that vitamin C is an important antioxidant that is vital for healthy brain function. (1) Our brains use a lot of oxygen, which makes them more prone to oxidative stress than other organs; it’s no wonder the brain has higher concentrations of vitamin C. In fact, some studies have found higher levels of C in those with healthy cognitive function but lower levels in those with impaired function. (2) It may be because as an antioxidant, vitamin C helps protect the brain from oxidative stress that can impact cognitive performance.

A Powerful Antioxidant

Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that protects out entire body, inside and out, from free radical damage. It helps the body manufacture collagen, which keeps our skin, eyes, and blood vessels strong. It helps prevent damage that can lead to a host of health conditions associated with oxidative stress and can even help your body regenerate vitamin E supplies. This may be the reason why it has been associated with lower blood pressure and considered a heart healthy nutrient.

Anti-Aging

Some researchers have gone so far as to call C the anti-aging vitamin. That’s because it is involved with collagen synthesis; the protein that keeps our skin from sagging. Collagen is not only necessary for firm skin, but also plays a role in skin repair and helps maintain the integrity of ligaments and tendons. It also gives our blood vessels flexibility which becomes more important as we age.

Signs of aging include wrinkles and deterioration of our eyes and overall health. Many aging experts claim that free radicals accelerate the aging process, while superior nutrition seems to slow it down. Antioxidants like vitamin C help ward off the signs of aging as it combats free radical damage. Consuming a diet high in foods that are abundant with this nutrient can help you fight the signs of aging, while supplementing with vitamin C can fill in any nutritional gaps.

Stress Management

Nutrition plays a role in not only physical health, but our mental health, as well. Our bodies need a supply of vitamins, minerals, and micronutrients to function at full capacity. And our brains rely on nutrients and antioxidants like vitamin C to function at its best. But vitamin C is also necessary for the balance of healthy brain chemicals that our bodies naturally produce.

When under stress, our bodies become depleted of nutrients. In fact, stress can impair the digestive system, leading to a lessened ability to break down and extract nutrients from foods we eat. This can create a cycle of stress and malnutrition as each condition worsens the other. To make matters worse, low levels of vitamin C have been linked to negative moods like sadness and anxiety.

This may be why researchers have found that vitamin C should be considered a part of stress management protocols. It seems to suppress stress while some studies showed that those who consume higher amounts of antioxidants like vitamin C report feeling calmer and less anxious.

Conclusion

Citrus fruits like oranges and lemons are known to be high in vitamin C, but you can also add strawberries, raspberries, cantaloupe, and red peppers to the list of foods rich in C. Since most foods contain far less than the RDA of this nutrient, aim for 7 – 9 servings of fruits and vegetables every day. And if you believe you need more, supplements are well tolerated and found to be useful when it comes to keeping your blood levels of vitamin C in a healthy range. And with all the benefits, you don’t want to miss your daily dose of this important nutrient.

References:

1 Harrison FE, May JM. Vitamin C function in the brain: vital role of the ascorbate transporter SVCT2. Free Radic Biol Med. 2009;46(6):719‐730. doi:10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2008.12.018

2 Travica N, Ried K, Sali A, Scholey A, Hudson I, Pipingas A. Vitamin C Status and Cognitive Function: A Systematic Review. Nutrients. 2017;9(9):960. Published 2017 Aug 30. doi:10.3390/nu9090960

Elderberry Vitamin C and Zinc ECZ Immune Support Drops

ECZ Immune Support

 

All natural Elderberry, Vitamin C and Zinc to easily add daily immune support. Liquid drops for fast absorption and more bioavailability.  Naturally sourced Elderberry, Vitamin C and Zinc to easily add daily immune support

  • Liquid drops for fast absorption and more bioavailability
  • Better than pills, capsules or tablets
  • All natural, Vegan and Non-GMO ingredients

147 in stock

$17.49 $14.74

Buy 2 for FREE shipping!

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

A Woman’s Guide for Balance Nutrition, Health and Life

A Woman’s Guide for Balance Nutrition, Health and Life

Modern women have many roles to play in today’s world. We are caretakers and homemakers that also balance careers. With so much going on in our fast-paced world, we often put our own health on the back burner. But it is possible to balance your life while keeping your health a priority. Here are some ways that you can maintain a balanced and healthy lifestyle.

Balanced Diet

Our body, mind and spirit are intricately linked and the health of one depends upon the health of the other two. It is no secret that many of today’s health issues and illnesses are linked to stress, often stemming from emotional duress that is difficult to maintain in today’s busy world.

Nutrition plays a big role in not only our physical health, but our mental health as well. Many health care experts have shared with us information on why we get the “sugar blues,” and many of us know the energy-sapping, after-effects of a junk food meal. Unfortunately, it is also difficult finding time to plan and shop for healthy meals every day of the week. But here are some tips that can help:

  • Begin your day with one or two pieces of fresh fruit. While a smoothie might help you feel full and provide protein, fresh fruit will provide the fiber your body requires, as it stimulates metabolism because your body has to work to digest it. And while smoothies may have their place in a healthy diet, pureeing fruit does not replace the health benefits of a fresh, whole piece of fruit, such as slowing sugar absorption and strengthening digestion.
  • Begin lunch and dinner with a green salad. It’s no secret that most of us do not get our share of green, leafy vegetables. But these veggies are a rich source of vitamins, phytonutrients, calcium and even antioxidants. They also aid in the body’s ability to detoxify, are anti-aging and may even help burn fat.
  • Hydrate with fresh, spring water. Drinking six to eight glasses of water every day helps your body replace missing fluids and keeps your internal systems functioning in a healthy manner. Advertising today attempts to appeal to women by promoting sugary sports drinks that can actually dehydrate you or add extra calories. Sports drinks often contain added colorings, chemicals for sweetening and excess sodium and potassium. Even the healthier ones may be good for athletes during training, but overkill for the average person. To quench your thirst, opt for spring water is better at promoting good health and improving exercise performance.
  • Avoid junk food. No matter how many healthy foods you eat, your health will not improve if you consume too much junk food. That’s because these are high in unhealthy fats, sodium, sugar, and processing chemicals that can add weight or sap our energy. So, if you are short on time, don’t use the fast-food drive through. Instead, create healthy and easy to grab food at home. Some ideas include preparing salad that you can grab and go anytime, fresh berries and yogurt for a protein rich snack, or a fruit salad made ahead of time.

Balanced Exercise

Most women know that exercise is necessary for a healthy lifestyle. But overdoing it can throw you off balance with overtraining or spending too much time at the gym or working out. This can lead to a mentality of “all or nothing” and when life gets busy, exercise will be on the cutting board. But check out these balanced exercise tips:

  • Set a schedule for exercise and stick to it
  • Strive for 30 minutes of exercise, five days each week and stick with it
  • If you can comfortably fit in the above exercise schedule for a couple weeks, then increase your exercise time, if you like
  • Stick to easy to access exercises like walking, jogging, or working out at home
  • If you hit the gym, work out in the morning to ensure your workout will not interfere with the rest of your day
  • Remember that moderate exercise for 150 minutes each week is always better than none

Mental and Emotional Health

Our mental and emotional state are inherently connected to our physical health. Learning to take care of mental health can go a long way in helping us stay on track with diet and healthy habits. At the same time, healthy habits like diet, hydration, exercise, and sleep contribute to a healthier emotional state and happier outlook on life. Here are more tips for keeping your mental health balanced:

  • Consume mainly fresh vegetables and fruits with healthy, unprocessed proteins and unprocessed grains as much as possible
  • Supplement your nutrition when you fall short
  • Be kind to yourself and practice turning off negative self-talk
  • Be realistic about your goals in work and health
  • Get out in nature as often as you can, even it if it is for a short hike in a park
  • Practice mindfulness
  • Manage stress

Speaking of Managing Stress…

Stress affects our lives in a number of ways. Sometimes we can deal with it but sometimes it might take over when we hit a series of seemingly unmanageable situations. When stress takes over it can lead to drug or alcohol misuse or abuse, cause upset stomach, headaches, fatigue and even pain. It can lead to binge eating and weight gain or digestive issues and malnutrition. Either way, learning to manage stress is a necessity for a balanced, healthy life.

Managing stress takes practice and persistence but is something everyone can do. It can be as easy as practicing stretching exercises at home, taking a yoga class, or practicing meditation for 5 minutes each day. Here are some stress managements practices that can easily fit into most lifestyles:

  • Daily 15-minute full body stretching session
  • 20-minute walk, five days each week
  • 20-minute yoga class four days each week
  • 5-10 minutes of daily meditation
  • Journal daily, to help clear your mind

Strive to find at least one practice that easily fits into your everyday life, and stick with it. Also remember to treat yourself when you can to a massage, a drive in nature or a walk at the beach. And remember that the healthier your diet is the easier you will find it is to manage stress.

$19.99 $16.76

117 in stock

$18.49

39 in stock

$18.99 $14.37

36 in stock

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/ 

Posted on Leave a comment

Zinc and Why it is Important for Health

Zinc and Why it is Important for Health

Zinc and Why it is Important for Health

Why zinc? Our bodies have a line of defense against bacteria, virus and other pathogens known as the immune system. Having immunity against microorganisms that can harm us depends upon whether our lifestyles support health or work against us. When in a weakened state, we become more susceptible to microorganisms that can make us sick.

But, just like any other bodily system, the immune system can be supported with a healthy lifestyle and superior nutrition, allowing it to function at its best. And when we fall short, zinc may be one way to help support the immune system.

What is Zinc?

Zinc is a nutrient that the body needs to function properly and is classified as an essential mineral or essential trace element. This means it is essential we get this particular mineral from our diet, through nutritious food sources. And while many foods are touted for their nutritional content, it pays to be choosey because highly processed, fried foods and foods cooked at high temperatures may naturally lose their mineral content.

Zinc in Your Diet

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of zinc is 8 mg for adult females and 11 mg for adult males, with certain groups such as pregnant women, requiring slightly more. Luckily you can get zinc from a variety of food sources including:

  • Oysters
  • Red meat
  • Poultry
  • Shellfish
  • Beans
  • Fortified breakfast cereals
  • Fortified bread

Oysters come in at the highest amount of zinc with 74 mg per serving. The next highest is beef chuck roast at 7 mg per serving, with all the other foods being significantly less. The trick to zinc intake is to get a steady amount into your daily diet; a task that proves to be more difficult than it seems.

Most people do not consume oysters on a daily basis, while others may be vegetarians or vegans, making it a little more challenging to get the RDA of this all-important mineral. At the same time, foods such as fortified cereals or breads contain synthetic zinc, yet not all of these are digestible. For example, zinc oxide comes back with mixed study results, while other forms like zinc gluconate are merely a chemical substitute for the true mineral. But plant-based forms of zinc may be the most absorbable as it is in a more natural state.

Zinc and Your Body

Zinc plays many roles in our health and is found in every cell of the body. It is required for healthy digestion and metabolism, nerve function, skin health and even protein production. It plays a role in cell growth and division and most importantly for many people today, it supports immune function.

The role that zinc plays in immunity is one reason why many throat lozenges and over-the-counter cold remedies contain this important element. While many studies have been done, a 1998 review of these suggested that zinc was indeed helpful for reducing the severity and duration of cold symptoms.

Chronic internal inflammation is a problem for many people with busy lifestyles, and results from risk factors like stress, poor diet, certain medications and sedentary lifestyles. Surprisingly, older adults who used zinc supplements were able to reduce inflammatory markers, one of the only ways to measure the risk of chronic inflammation. (1) This may be why zinc also seems to be an effective mineral to support immune health since inflammation has an effect on immunity.

Zinc Deficiency

Some people are deficient in zinc because either their diet does not include zinc rich foods or digestive issues inhibit absorption of the mineral. Pregnant women, older adults and women who are breastfeeding are at the highest risk of zinc deficiency. And for those who breastfeed, a zinc deficiency may pass to the nursing infant.

Some researchers find that zinc deficiency is prevalent in populations of low animal protein consumption and increased cereal consumption. (2) Vegans and vegetarians have lower levels of zinc because their diets lack meat and fish. But adding to the problem is that while they may eat more mineral-rich beans than non-vegetarians, phytates in beans, legumes, nuts and seeds can impair digestion and make it difficult to absorb the small amounts of zinc that they do consume. Soaking these foods before consuming them may help lessen this problem.

Others who may be at risk for zinc deficiency include those with Chrohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and alcohol addiction because they may not sufficiently absorb zinc from their diet. Also, at risk are those with pancreatic disease, celiac disease, diabetes or chronic liver disease. Signs of zinc deficiency includes the following:

  • Hair loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Poor immunity
  • Eye and skin lesions
  • Slow wound healing

Zinc Supplements

Many people use zinc supplements to enhance their diets, especially if they have one of the above risk factors such as digestive problems. Supplementation is also popular during cold and flu season as a natural way to support the immune system. But be wary of zinc in many over-the-counter throat lozenges or syrups as it may be a form that is difficult for the body to use.

For best absorption, zinc supplements are most effective when taken within two hours after a meal and in liquid form. And if you are using it to ward of a cold or flu, enhanced supplements that include a plant-based form of zinc along with vitamin C and herbs like elderberry may offer additional immune support.

Conclusion

In today’s world of uncertainty, stress becomes the norm, wreaking havoc on digestion and our immune systems, while superbugs seem to be more prominent. Doing all you can to support your body can help you stay strong and better protect you from harmful pathogens. Support your health with a wholesome diet, daily exercise, rest and supplementation when you need to ensure you stay healthy through any season.

References:

1 Bao B, Prasad AS, Beck FW, et al. Zinc decreases C-reactive protein, lipid peroxidation, and inflammatory cytokines in elderly subjects: a potential implication of zinc as an atheroprotective agent. Am J Clin Nutr. 2010;91(6):1634–1641. doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.28836

2 Roohani N, Hurrell R, Kelishadi R, Schulin R. Zinc and its importance for human health: An integrative review. J Res Med Sci. 2013;18(2):144–157.

Elderberry Vitamin C and Zinc ECZ Immune Support Drops

ECZ Immune Support

 

All natural Elderberry, Vitamin C and Zinc to easily add daily immune support. Liquid drops for fast absorption and more bioavailability.  Naturally sourced Elderberry, Vitamin C and Zinc to easily add daily immune support

  • Liquid drops for fast absorption and more bioavailability
  • Better than pills, capsules or tablets
  • All natural, Vegan and Non-GMO ingredients

147 in stock

$17.49 $14.74

Buy 2 for FREE shipping!

Cindy Papp

Cindy Papp

Author

Body Cleanse and Detoxification Specialist with over 22 years experience; BSc in Holistic Nutrition, C.C.T. Colon Hydrotherapist, Cert. Holistic Health Practitioner, Spiritual Guide, Energy Work, Reiki, Author, Holistic Health Researcher

For more information on Cindy visit https://www.springclean-cleanse.com/